Dying In the Name Of Fun

They have their fatalities too

At Save Driving we are always advocating safe driving and teaching good values to your kids. We cant think of any stronger way of driving this message home, than with the real thing.
Sunday afternoon, on my way to work I drove through the crash scene of the carnage that took place hours earlier, Where three Kids lost their lives in a high speed joy ride at over 100 mph. These kids were playing Russian roulette with their lives and the general public, who uses the roadways. There are many more out there whose Destiny is forged in an inferno of mangled steel. I know that we all have to die at some point, but that way is not my way, suffering excruciatingly in mangled steel. There are many adults who test the hand of faith daily  on our roadways.
The ones I look out for mostly, are the ones that are two miles away from their exits and they Punch the engine, reaching speeds of up to 100 showing off. When I lived in Pa I used to call them Jersey Drivers. They are everywhere, mindless Drones, so why am I not surprised that a sixteen year old would find that type of behavior fascinating. I once observed a Mother transporting her four children in a mini van, the kids were moving around while she played the Kamikaze Mom,weaving traffic at 65mph in a forty five mph zone. I travel not only  by sight, but by Faith also and I lead by example. what this mother was doing unconsciously, was telling her Children that it was cool to go driving through city streets like a maniac.
Kids can’t wait to drive, when my nephew was eight years old, someone left the keys in the ignition, guess what, he started the car, took off and crashed it. We try to teach them all they need to know to survive in life, why not teach them good driving skills by the way you operate your vehicle. Auto Manufacturers and NASCAR have already planted the seed in their heads that Cars ar’nt for Transportation, but for racing, the damage is done. When I lived in Pa and NASCAR came to Pocono Raceway, it was like a national holiday, people took off from work, school and life to be at the Track watching cars traveled way past 170 mph. After leaving the Track they would take what they have learned from NASCAR to the streets. Why then would you be surprised, when young bored Urban children take to stealing cars and racing them through City Streets. Kids from affluent families borrow their families BMW, smitten by the Speed Bug and never made their way back home, bottom line, Speed kills.
Ps.  Values, limitations, boundaries and consequences can keep them alive.

Three boys dead after fiery crash in stolen SUV, Pinellas sheriff says

“I value my life,” he said. “I’m not trying to be dead.”

Just eight months later, on Sunday morning, three boys died and Deyon was led away in handcuffs after a fiery, high-speed crash sent a stolen Ford Explorer pinwheeling through the air down Tampa Road in Palm Harbor, bursting into flames.

VIGIL: Friends, family gather in Clearwater to remember teens who died in SUV crash

Eight teenage car thieves from Pinellas have now died in the past two years, and dozens of innocent people have been injured, amid a juvenile auto theft epidemic so pervasive that even kids who vow to stop are then climbing back into stolen cars.

“When you have 14-, 15-, 16-year-olds that are dying because of their actions, it needs to stop,” said Pinellas Sheriff Bob Gualtieri. “This is a deadly game.”

The boys who died in the Ford Explorer were driving more than 100 mph, playing a “cat and mouse” game with another stolen car at 4:40 a.m., before they likely ran a red light and hit the Toyota Camry of a 29-year-old man on his way to work, the sheriff said.

Both the Ford Explorer and the Chrysler Sebring it was speeding with were stolen Thursday from a car dealership in Clearwater. Deputies spotted the vehicles early Sunday morning turning into a subdivision in Oldsmar, where there had been a recent rash of burglaries.

HOT WHEELS: How kids are driving Pinellas County’s car-theft epidemic

The cars were then spotted on Tampa Road. They split up, and the Explorer hit the Camry before smashing into a billboard pole and several parked cars, spinning and rolling down Tampa Road in flames. Two of the dead boys were found in the wreckage; the third had been thrown onto the street.

The boys who died were identified as Jimmie Goshey, 14; Dejarae Thomas, 16; and Keontae Brown, 16. Keontae’s brother, 14-year-old Keondrae Brown, was also in the SUV but survived. He was taken to Bayfront Health St. Petersburg and was in stable condition Sunday.

THE KIDS Six teens involved in stolen car crash have troubled histories

Deputies found the Chrysler Sebring at Sunset Point and Keene roads in Clearwater. Kamal Campbell, 18, and Deyon were taken into custody and face charges of grand theft auto and resisting arrest without violence.

The driver of the Camry, Ricky Melendez Jr., suffered a fractured ankle and tibia, as well as a broken collarbone, according to his father.

“My heart just dropped,” Ricky Melendez Sr. said. “After looking at the crash, I don’t know how he survived.”

Chris Urso | Times

The Ford Explorer struck another vehicle and spiraled into the air at around 4:30 a.m., Pinellas sheriff Bob Gualtieri said.

A continuing epidemic

Local officials said the deaths were a tragic but inevitable consequence of the ongoing auto theft problem.

“This scenario plays out daily throughout Pinellas County,” Gualtieri said. “The only difference between what didn’t happen yesterday and the day before that and the day before that is they didn’t roll, hit a car and get killed.”

 

In March 2016, three teenage girls from St. Petersburg died when they crashed a stolen car into a cemetery pond while trying to flee from deputies.

The epidemic was recently the subject of “Hot Wheels,” a Tampa Bay Times series that found that Pinellas kids driving stolen cars crash at least every four days. Teenagers here have made a sport of “car-hopping,” walking neighborhood streets looking for unlocked cars with keys left inside to steal. In 2015, police in Pinellas arrested juveniles 499 times for grand theft auto, more than in any other Florida county.

Reporters spoke with judges, police, lawyers, victims and the young car thieves themselves, who said that auto theft has become popular because kids don’t see many consequences after they’re caught.

Each of the teens involved in Sunday’s crash had “extremely extensive criminal histories”; several had committed car thefts like those chronicled in the Times series, the sheriff said. Many young car thieves wear gloves to avoid leaving fingerprints while they car-hop; one of the boys died still wearing his.

Clearwater police Chief Dan Slaughter called the deaths “senseless.”

“Many have worked so hard to avoid this inevitable tragedy,” Slaughter said. “The juvenile justice system needs to do a better job with conducting juvenile risk assessments so chronic offenders who are endangering the public, and themselves, can be reasonably detained.”

Keontae’s grandfather, Sylvester Brown, said the boy was released from custody just days earlier.

Brown said he wishes the juvenile system had been tougher on his grandson. “Why did they let him go like that?” he asked. “They should be more hard on them.”

Keontae’s father, Adontai, said his son “was doing something he shouldn’t have.”

“I admit that — I’m not going to sit around here and sugarcoat and say he’s the best kid in the world,” the dad said. “He had his problems, he did stuff that he wasn’t supposed to do, (but) he’s still a kid. He’s still a child.”

He added that it’s difficult to parent a child who has no respect for the courts.

“If they keep getting away with it, you think they’re going to respect the parent? No.”

Jimmie’s cousin Aja Jenkins said the boy played football growing up.

“He was loving. He was kind,” said Jenkins, 23. “He had a good heart. … (Jimmie) fell into the wrong crowd.”

Another ‘wake-up call’

Public officials who have been meeting to brainstorm solutions to the car theft problem said they were “heartbroken” and “at a loss.”

“These kids slipped through the cracks again,” said State Rep. Kathleen Peters, R-Treasure Island. “Somehow, whatever it is we’re doing did not protect them.”

“We need to intervene before it becomes another tragedy in our community, and we’ve seen far too much of this,” said Pinellas County Commissioner Ken Welch. “If anyone felt sheltered, this should, I think, be a wake-up call that we’re all invested in this. We’re all invested in trying to reach these young people.”

Welch described the problem as “a combination of a lack of consequence in the legal system, a lack of intervention by the community, parents, everyone, to get to these kids early.

“It’s only a miracle that more innocent folks haven’t died so far,” he said. “But I think it’s still a ticking time bomb.”

VIDEO: Chasing 13-year-old car thief Tyron ‘T-Man’ McKinnon

Pat Gerard, another county commissioner and former Largo mayor, said she was frustrated that Pinellas “wasn’t getting a handle” on the epidemic. “Hopefully this is a warning to the other kids that are doing this that, gee, they’re taking their lives in their hands,” she said. “We have a small group of kids who are making a big game out of this. And the game’s turning deadly. And it’s just not funny anymore. It never was funny.”

U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist, D-St. Petersburg, has pledged federal funding for activities that would engage Pinellas youth who are turning to crime. He said he is “praying” for the families of the boys and for the community, as well as planning an Aug. 24 roundtable with local teenagers to talk about why they steal cars and what would make them stop.

‘I cannot bury my child’

Deyon’s mother, Demetria Coley, said her son was doing well for a while. She had helped him get a job at a Kentucky Fried Chicken in Dunedin. She moved houses, hoping to get him away from a bad crowd.

He started getting in trouble once more in early July, running with the wrong kids again, she said. “I keep telling him don’t go with them, they are not your friends.”

Deyon, who spoke to the Times in December for the Hot Wheels series, was arrested for grand theft auto again last month, and was later sent home with an ankle monitor. It was removed about five days before the crash, his mom said.

On Saturday night, Deyon ordered a pizza for dinner and ate it in his room. She thinks he must have slipped out after she went to sleep.

A single mother, Coley said she has begged judges and the juvenile system to do more to help her and to make her child see the consequences of his crimes.

“That’s why these children are dying. Because they keep slapping them on the hand,” she said. “I buried my mama, my grandma, my daddy. I’m the only child. And I’m all Deyon’s got. And this is what he’s taking me through.

“I cannot bury my child. They need to help me to help save his life.”

Times staff writer Melissa Gomez contributed to this report. Contact Lisa Gartner at lgartner@tampabay.com. Follow @lisagartner. Contact Laura C. Morel at lmorel@tampabay.com. Follow @lauracmorel. Contact Zachary T. Sampson at zsampson@tampaabay.com. Follow @zacksampson.

MORE ON TEEN CAR THEFTS

THE CHASE: Cops, teen car thieves and a dangerous game

EDITORIAL: Coming together to reduce car thefts

5 WAYS: Officials are trying to stop Pinellas teen car thieves

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